Minimum bactericidal concentration of phenols extracted from oil vegetation water on spoilers, starters and food-borne bacteria


Submitted: 8 July 2014
Accepted: 20 December 2014
Published: 28 May 2015
Abstract Views: 1357
PDF: 979
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Authors

  • Luca Fasolato Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
  • Barbara Cardazzo Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
  • Stefania Balzan Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
  • Lisa Carraro Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
  • Agnese Taticchi Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Perugia, Italy.
  • Filomena Montemurro Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
  • Enrico Novelli Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Legnaro (PD), Italy.
The aim of the study was to assess the in vitro effect of phenols extracted from oil vegetation water (PEOW) on several food-borne strains. Antibacterial activity of PEOW was based on the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) on microtitre assay. The taxa tested were: Staphylococcus (n. 5), Listeria (n. 4), Escherichia (n. 2), Salmonella (n. 1), Pseudomonas (n. 3), Lactobacillus (n. 2) and Pediococcus (n. 1). S. aureus and L. monocytogens showed the lowest level of resistance to PEOW (MBC=1.5-3 mg/mL). In contrast, the Gram negative strains (e.g. S. Typhimurium and Pseudomonas spp.) were in some cases unaffected by the tested doses and the MBCs ranged between 6 to 12 mg/mL. Starter cultures were dramatically reduced on growth (e.g. Staphylococcus xylosus; 0.75 mg/mL MBC). The thresholds for pathogenic strains could be considered for further applications of PEOW in food models (e.g. shelf life or challenge test studies).

1.
Fasolato L, Cardazzo B, Balzan S, Carraro L, Taticchi A, Montemurro F, Novelli E. Minimum bactericidal concentration of phenols extracted from oil vegetation water on spoilers, starters and food-borne bacteria. Ital J Food Safety [Internet]. 2015 May 28 [cited 2024 Jun. 15];4(2). Available from: https://www.pagepressjournals.org/ijfs/article/view/ijfs.2015.4519

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