Thymus vulgaris (red thyme) and Caryophyllus aromaticus (clove) essential oils to control spoilage microorganisms in pork under modified atmosphere


Submitted: 29 January 2016
Accepted: 6 April 2016
Published: 3 August 2016
Abstract Views: 1112
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Authors

  • Serena D'Amato Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
  • Giovanni Mazzarrino Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
  • Chiara Rossi Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
  • Annalisa Serio Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
  • Clemencia Chaves López Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
  • Gaetano Vitale Celano Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano (BA), Italy.
  • Antonello Paparella Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE), Italy.
In recent years, it has been confirmed that essential oils (EOs) exert antimicrobial activity as they are able to inhibit cell growth and inactivate microbial cells. The application of biopreservation strategies by means of EOs opens up interesting perspectives in the food industry, including meat production. The paper aims to evaluate the effects of Thymus vulgaris (red thyme) and Caryophyllus aromaticus (cloves) EOs on the development of the spoilage population of fresh pork packaged under modified atmosphere (MAP). In particular, the research was focused on Brochothrix thermosphacta, a specific spoilage microorganism of fresh meat packed in anaerobic conditions or under MAP. Amongst seven EOs, those that showed the highest antimicrobial activity on 5 B. thermosphacta strains in vitro were: cloves [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.6-2.5 mg/mL], savory (MIC 2.5-5.0 mg/mL), and red thyme (MIC 2.5 to 20 mg/mL). Red thyme and cloves EOs were selected for meat treatment, by increasing the dose at 20 and 40 mg/mL respectively, to take into account the matrix effect that can reduce EO availability. In spite of the minor efficacy observed in vitro, 40 mg/mL red thyme EO strongly limited the growth of B. thermosphacta in pork samples up to day 6 of storage [below 3.0 Log colony forming unit (CFU)/g, starting from 2.0 Log CFU/g at time 0], and exerted an antimicrobial effect also on the aerobic mesophilic count. Good results were obtained also with 20 mg/mL red thyme EO. The control of B. thermosphacta growth through EOs encourages research on alternative methods for extending the shelf life of fresh meat under MAP.

Serena D'Amato, Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Mosciano Sant'Angelo (TE)
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment. PhD. student
1.
D’Amato S, Mazzarrino G, Rossi C, Serio A, Chaves López C, Celano GV, Paparella A. Thymus vulgaris (red thyme) and Caryophyllus aromaticus (clove) essential oils to control spoilage microorganisms in pork under modified atmosphere. Ital J Food Safety [Internet]. 2016 Aug. 3 [cited 2024 Jun. 24];5(3). Available from: https://www.pagepressjournals.org/ijfs/article/view/5785

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