Emergency contraception: different bioethical perspectives

Abstract

Emergency contraceptives, in this case post-morning pills, are contraceptive methods used to avoid an unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse. Their use is feeding a strong ethical debate between subjects for and against their prescription and leading some health professionals to conscientious objection. Among people contrary to prescription some oppose to it because of a general refuse of all contraceptive methods, others considering post-morning pills as abortive. Among people supporting prescription, some consider emergency contraception necessary to assure fundamental women’s rights, in particular the right to sexual auto-determination, while others prescribe emergency contraception only to avoid a greater demand for abortion. It is up to the Italian National Health Service warranting a correct balance between the two opposite positions, that can protect women’s right of access to health services.

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Published
2007-10-18
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Section
Ethics and Bioethics
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How to Cite
Bo, M. (2007). Emergency contraception: different bioethical perspectives. Emergency Care Journal, 3(5), 39-43. https://doi.org/10.4081/ecj.2007.5.39