A randomized controlled trial on Aspirin and complex regional pain syndrome after radius fractures

  • Amir Sobhani Eraghi Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, Rasoul Akram Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Amir Khazanchin Bone and Joint Reconstruction Research Center, Shafa Orthopedic Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Nima Hosseinzadeh | hosseinzade.nima@gmail.com Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, Rasoul Akram Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran; Bone and Joint Reconstruction Research Center, Shafa Orthopedic Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Alireza Pahlevansabagh Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, Rasoul Akram Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is often diagnosed in patients who are recovered with surgery or injury. CRPS is usually diagnosed in patients recovering from distal radius fractures. The aim of study was the effects of aspirin in prevention of the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) following a fracture of distal radius. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 91 patients with unilateral extra-articular distal radius fractures were randomly allocated to receive either placebo (PLA) or 500 mg of aspirin (ASA) daily for 7 days. The effect of aspirin on the occurrence of CRPS was evaluated. The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically in the second, fourth and twelfth weeks by a physician who was unaware of the treatment allocation. Ninety-one patients (ASA, n=44; PLA, n=47) were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of CRPS in all patients was 16.5%. The prevalence of CRPS in the aspirin group was lower (13.6%) than the placebo group (19.1%), but this difference was not statistically significant. The only significant difference was the lower rate of regional osteoporosis seen in the radiographs of aspirin group. Mean age was significantly higher in the patients with CRPS. Also, comminuted distal radius fractures (A3-type) were significantly more common in the patients with CRPS. Administration of aspirin in patients with a distal radius fracture was associated with a lower incidence of CRPS, but, not statistically significant. Further investigations needs to be done with a larger sample size, longer follow-up period and multi-center design.

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Published
2020-04-01
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Section
Original Articles
Keywords:
Distal radius fractures, Complex Regional Pain Syndrom, Aspirin, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
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How to Cite
Eraghi, A. S., Khazanchin, A., Hosseinzadeh, N., & Pahlevansabagh, A. (2020). A randomized controlled trial on Aspirin and complex regional pain syndrome after radius fractures. European Journal of Translational Myology, 30(1), 202-209. https://doi.org/10.4081/ejtm.2019.8643