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Appraisal of the practice of ocular self-medication in Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana

Samuel Kyei, Stephen Ocansey, Emmanuel Kwasi Abu, Bismark Nyarko Gyedu
  • Samuel Kyei
    Department of Optometry, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana | skyei@ucc.edu.gh
  • Stephen Ocansey
    Department of Optometry, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana; Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Emmanuel Kwasi Abu
    Department of Optometry, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
  • Bismark Nyarko Gyedu
    Department of Optometry, School of Physical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to assess the practice of ocular self-medication among people of the Cape Coast Metropolis, Central Region of Ghana. A population-based survey involving 421 respondents ≥18 years old was conducted. A pre-tested interview-based questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics, ocular symptoms for which selfmedication was practiced, medical knowledge and self-care orientation. Households were systematically and randomly selected as study units. Analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Descriptive results were expressed as frequency, percentage, and mean±standard deviation, X2 test was used for associations, and logistic regression was used to test for predictors of the practice of ocular self-medication. Prevalence of ocular self-medication was 23.3% with itchy eye being the main ocular symptom for which self-medication was practiced. Local pharmacies were the main source of drug for ocular self-medication. There was no association between medical knowledge and the practice of ocular self-medication (X2=0.126; P=0.722). Some 25.5% experienced adverse effects. In conclusion, the practice of ocular self-medication was without recourse to adequate concept of the practice of self-care but its negative effect was mitigated by the low self-care orientation of the people.

Keywords

ocular symptoms, self-medication, adverse effect, Africa

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Submitted: 2013-12-01 19:09:18
Published: 2014-06-18 11:40:37
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Copyright (c) 2014 Samuel Kyei, Stephen Ocansey, Emmanuel Kwasi Abu, Bismark Nyarko Gyedu

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