Prevalence study of nosocomial infections in a north-Bari region hospital in the years 2007-2010

Tito Del Gaudio, Maria Antonietta Distasi, Antonella De Toma, Rosaria Pandolfo, Giovanni Grilli
  • Maria Antonietta Distasi
    Affiliation not present
  • Antonella De Toma
    Affiliation not present
  • Rosaria Pandolfo
    Affiliation not present
  • Giovanni Grilli
    Affiliation not present


Nosocomial infections, arising from complications during hospital treatment, represent one of the most important cause of disease. The Andria hospital has initiated a prevalence study, as a part of a general program promoted by the “Agenzia Regionale per la Sanità” (Regional Health Board) of Regione Puglia. Samples were collected from patients hospitalized in the period 2007 - 2010. Risk factors, ongoing infections, selected antibiotic therapy, site of infection, microorganism types, as well as patient’s clinic and personal data, were all elements taken into account. The study shows that nosocomial infections, due to different health care related risk factors, are most frequently encountered in Intensive Care Units. A poor adhesion to the Regione Puglia antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines was observed in surgery. An insufficient use of cultural methods to confirm/diagnose the presence of bacterial infections was also observed; this fact could lead to underestimate the incidence of nosocomial infections.


Nosocomial infections, prevalence study

Full Text:

Submitted: 2014-02-13 09:57:05
Published: 2012-09-30 00:00:00
Search for citations in Google Scholar
Related articles: Google Scholar
Abstract views:


Article Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

Copyright (c) 2012 Tito Del Gaudio, Maria Antonietta Distasi, Antonella De Toma, Rosaria Pandolfo, Giovanni Grilli

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
© PAGEPress 2008-2018     -     PAGEPress is a registered trademark property of PAGEPress srl, Italy.     -     VAT: IT02125780185