Cover Image

Do psychological factors help to reduce body mass in obesity or is it vice versa? Selected psychological aspects and effectiveness of the weight-loss program in the obese patients

Monika Bąk-Sosnowska, Adam Pawlak, Violetta Skrzypulec-Plinta
  • Monika Bąk-Sosnowska
    Department of Psychology, School of Health Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland | b_monique@poczta.onet.pl
  • Adam Pawlak
    Department of Psychology, Katowice School of Economics, Katowice, Poland
  • Violetta Skrzypulec-Plinta
    Department of Women’s Disease Control and Prevention, School of Health Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the strength and direction of the correlation between cognitive appraisal, emotional state, social functioning and the effectiveness of a weight-loss program undertaken by obese subjects. The out-patient weight-loss program encompassed 150 obese women. Assessments were carried out at four time points: at the start of the weight-loss program and then after a 5%, 10% and a 15% reduction of the initial body mass. The research tools used were: a survey, the Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (SAQ), the Emotional State Questionnaire (ESQ), and the Q-Sort Social Functioning Questionnaire. The cognitive appraisal, emotional state and social functioning of the study group changed significantly (P<0.001). Significantly more individuals with a 15% body mass reduction, as compared with individuals with no body mass reduction, had an early obesity onset, i.e. at the age of <10 years old (P<0.001). Significantly more individuals with no body mass reduction, compared with individuals with a 15% reduction, had a later obesity onset, i.e. between the ages of 20 and 30 (P<0.001) and between 50 and 60 (P<0.001). Significantly more individuals with a 15% body mass reduction, compared with individuals with no mass reduction, had previously experienced the jojo effect (P<0.001) and had successfully lost weight (P<0.001). Significantly more individuals with no body mass reduction, compared with individuals with a15% reduction, had a history of unsuccessful attempts at reducing body mass (P<0.001). We conclude that the attitude of obese patients towards a weight-loss program is not a deciding factor for its effectiveness. As body mass reduces, the attitude improves.

Keywords

obesity, weight-loss, psychological factors, emotions, cognition

Full Text:

PDF
HTML
Submitted: 2012-10-30 10:08:28
Published: 2013-03-21 15:35:50
Search for citations in Google Scholar
Related articles: Google Scholar
Abstract views:
1143

Views:
PDF
482
HTML
171

Article Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Metrics powered by PLOS ALM


Copyright (c) 2013 Monika Bąk-Sosnowska, Adam Pawlak, Violetta Skrzypulec-Plinta

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
 
© PAGEPress 2008-2018     -     PAGEPress is a registered trademark property of PAGEPress srl, Italy.     -     VAT: IT02125780185     •     Privacy