The association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. Systematic review and meta-analysis

  • Gianpaolo Perletti | gianpaolo.perletti@uninsubria.it Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Busto A., Italy Department of Human Structure and Repair, Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, Italy. http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7209-9191
  • Elena Monti Università degli Studi dell’Insubria Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Busto A., Italy.
  • Vittorio Magri Urology Secondary Care Clinic, ASST-Nord, Milan; Department of Urology, University of Milan Fondazione Ca' Granda IRCCS - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Tommaso Cai Department of Urology, Santa Chiara Regional Hospital, Trento, Italy.
  • Anne Cleves Velindre NHS Trust Library, Cardiff University, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
  • Alberto Trinchieri Urology Unit, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy.
  • Emanuele Montanari Department of Urology, University of Milan Fondazione Ca' Granda IRCCS - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Objective: The main outcome of this review was the association between a history of clinical chronic prostatitis (NIH category II or III) and a histologically confirmed diagnosis of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Crude odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to analyze dichotomous data. For analysis of pooled data we adopted a random-effects model and the inverse variance weighing method. Heterogeneity was assessed by calculating the I2 value. Results: Out of 2794 screened records, we retrieved 16 full-text articles written in English, reporting the data of 15 case-control studies, involving 422.943 patients. Pooled analysis resulted in a significant crude odds ratio of 1.83 (95% CI: 1.43 to 2.35; P < 0.00001). The total set of data showed considerable heterogeneity (I2 = 91%). Both the Egger’s test and the Begg's test for funnel plot asymmetry did not reach statistical significance. The ‘trim and fill’ method applied to the funnel plot imputed 3 missing studies and the resulting adjusted estimate of the odds ratio was 2.12 (95% CI: 1.38 to 3.22). According to GRADE criteria, the overall quality of the meta-analysis data is low, mainly due to the presence of bias, confounders and extreme effect size outliers. Five among the included studies reported data assessed in 8015 African-American subjects. Pooled analysis resulted in a non-significant crude odds ratio of 1.59 (95% CI: 0.71 to 3.57; P = 0.26), and considerable heterogeneity (I2 = 90%). Conclusions: Meta-analysis of 15 case-control studies shows that a history of clinical chronic prostatitis can significantly increase the odds for prostate cancer in the general population, whereas such association in African-American individuals remains uncertain.

Dimensions

Altmetric

PlumX Metrics

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2017-12-31
Info
Issue
Section
Original Papers - Oncology
Keywords:
Prostate cancer, Prostatitis, Chronic prostatitis, Chronic pelvic pain syndrome, Meta-analysis, Case-control study
Statistics
  • Abstract views: 1744

  • PDF: 450
  • Supplementary Material: 155
How to Cite
Perletti, G., Monti, E., Magri, V., Cai, T., Cleves, A., Trinchieri, A., & Montanari, E. (2017). The association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Archivio Italiano Di Urologia E Andrologia, 89(4), 259-265. https://doi.org/10.4081/aiua.2017.4.259

Most read articles by the same author(s)

1 2 > >>